Vernacular

Since we are on the topic of words and phrases (you are reading a blog) and since both words and phrases have a sneaky tendency to come up in daily life, they need more attention and nurturing than they gply69barracudablue30enerally recieve. Your vocabulary, like your car, needs regular care and maintenance to function properly and last a long time.  Change those sparks-of-brilliance plugs, make sure your cliché-carburetor has the right gas/air mixture.

I am here, locution lug wrench in hand.

Words and phrases are odd creatures; people tend to overuse certain favorites, regularly mangle and misuse others simply because that is how they learned them, and most fail to increase the workable volume of useful and more colorful words and phrases available, which makes one dull and peanutsstillnot listenable to others.

Like the adults in a Peanuts TV spectacular.

We need to be vigilant to keep our vocabularic skills fresh and interesting by adding, discarding and modifying on a regular basis; shedding tired clichés like translucent snakeskin.  Plus, vocabulary building and repair has also been proven to keep minds more nimble and pliable, creating brain space and making it easier to absorb, store and utilize new linguistic concepts.

Dude. Its true.

Each of us has multiple vocabularies; the typical American possessing roughly six different, distinct lexicons.  There are the sets of words and phrases that we use in our jobs, vocations, and places of worship to name a few; most are very distinct from each other and while there is always some basic overlap, they are  also very demographic specific.  To drive home this point, I usually ask my inner-city high school students if they speak the same way to their moms and dads as they do to their friends.

“Ohhhhhhhh, nooooooo, Mr. Lucker.”

Family dynamics often revolve around a specific, DNA-linked dialect; most families have at least a few phrases or words – some entirely fabricated – that any outsider would be totally oblivious to.  Assimilating new members into rosettastonethe brood via most any means usually requires the newcomer to have to go all solo-Rosetta-stone on their new krewe.

My family has a distinct patois, featuring one phrase that stands head and wings above the rest.

In our household, when you are in vehement agreement with what was just said, you might respond, with considerable vigor, “I hear ya’ cluckin’, Big Chicken!”

That’s a good, gets to the heart-of-the-matter phrase to start vocab restoration with. Try it. Use it liberally in daily conversation with a hearty dash of enthusiasm – you’ll be surprised at how quickly this versatile little catch-phrase catches on:

“I hear ya’ cluckin’, Big Chicken!”chicken1

It’s also used a complimentary and validating phrase, as you are actively, positively acknowledging the opinion of the person you are agreeing with – you just need to up the enthusiasm and inflection in your voice a bit – emphasis on the possessive ‘I’.

“Iiiii hear ya’ cluckin’, Big Chicken!”

Moving on to more vocabulary repair and rehab while Big Chicken stews in your mind a bit.

A native of Minnesota, I longer go apoplectic when I hear people say ‘frozen tundra’ – must be a sign of maturity on my part. While that repetitively redundant phrase still irks me, I’ve moved on to more pertinent matters.

To wit…

The drink is ‘espresso’ NOT ‘expresso.’ Expecially when people who work in the coffee shop say ‘expresso’ I want to….espress to them my disappointment in their ignorance of the artistry and verbiage of their own craft. Which leads me to another familial-frequent turn-of-phrase:

“Buuuuuut, that’s just me!”

That one we stole outright from Spongebob Squarepants.  If he sues for royalties,  based on overall usage, we’re screwed.

And then there is the word pom-pon. Teaching high school, I get the chance to use this one (correctly) fairly frequently.

This one has bugged me for years, probably because I had a severe crush on a pom-pon girl when I was in high school, and I took umbrage at people disparaging her craft and the tools of her trade with one pathetically misspoken word.

Pom-pon. Pom-PON!

Some misguided dictionary editors now apparently recognize the second ‘pom’ as a legitimate and approved option.  Sigh. Language is a living, breathing thing, I know and champion that ideal, but sometimes…well, you just gotta draw a line: pom-pom = dumb-dumb, dumdums.

I had to take a morpheme to dull that pain.

Someone in my family should now intone: “I hear ya cluckin’, Big Chicken!”

Or not.

One other word quirk that comes in (less) handy. Years ago my mother gave me a nice red, cable knit sweater for Christmas. I unwrapped it, took it out of the box, held it up in front of me, then read the label – something I hadn’t seen before and haven’t since:chicken1

‘100% Virgin Acrylic.’

Make up your own punchline.

Okay, one last time before we take the training wheels off and let you use it on your own:

“I hear ya cluckin’, Big Chicken!”

 

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Synonym or Symptom

Pet phrases. Most of us have at least a few family idioms; odd turns of phrase they use on a regular basis due to the fact that they have been indelibly imprinted on the brains of said family members. Usually, these expressions are frequently uttered without conscious thought or awareness of the speaker.

Use of these phrases in and around domestic situations have a wide array of side effects, including, but not limited to or mutually exclusive of any combination thereof; amusement, annoyance, bewilderment, exasperation, confusion, disorientation. Family catch phrases can also result in bemusement, confusion, and occasional outright hostility.

Mostly, they are great familial touchstones.

From time to time I have dropped some of these sayings from the Lucker household into some of my blogs and articles. While I usually attempt to put the phrase into some sort of context, I frequently asked for further clarification or, in some cases, where it came from.

Here, for the first time in one locale, and for future reference for grandson Felix,  are some of the key phrases the Lucker family has, continues to, and will hopefully, in generational perpetuity, use and nurture. Each entry includes approximate date of coinage with etymology noted. (I am an English teacher.)

FAAAreee? Did some-body say FAAAree?” entered the Lucker lexicon in the early 1990’s when I was co-hosting a Saturday morning radio show about casino trips (whole other story) with old buddy Mike Iverson on a radio station in suburban St. Paul. It was the early days of Native American casinos in the Midwest, and in their frenzied competition, offered cheap bus rides with loads of enticements to get people to go to their casino. (Rolls of slot quarters for the slot machines, free steak dinners, etc.) Mike would begin explaining what your ten-dollar bus ticket would get you; upon his utterance of the word ‘free’ I would respond with “FAAAreee? Did somebody say FAAA-reee?”

The phrase has morphed from its intended use into an all-purpose phrase whenever one encounters something being given away. Has waned a bit, but is still very popular with daughter Lindsay.

Etymology: WLKX radio Saturday Morning Casino Show      First recorded use: circa 1993

“Hey, buddy! Only one shade of green in this town!” is a situationally limited phrase for use when you are behind someone at a red light, the light turns green, and the vehicle in front of you doesn’t move. There is some flexibility here as it can be used by either driver or passenger. Lindsay, now 28, discovered that this phrase had been imprinted in her temporal lobe in her high school days, when she found herself blurting it out while riding with friends.

Once in state of dormancy, this phrase has taken on new life with the now ubiquitous problem of people checking text messages at stop lights.

Etymology: Family car trips with my father      First recorded use: Early 1960’s

“I hear ya’ cluckin’ big chicken!” is a flexible phrase that can be used to show agreement, support or congratulations. A big part of its flexibility is in how simple inflection changes and tone can convey empathy: any enthusiastic version shows excitement, while a more melancholy take can show agreement and empathy with someone’s disappointment.
Someone: “That was the worst ninja ballerina movie I have ever seen!”
You: (In your best Eeyore voice, head nodding in agreement) “I hear ya cluckin’, big chicken.”

Etymology: unclear or not remembered      First recorded use: Mid 1990’s

“Its Mexican restaurant weather; chili today, hot tamale.” is actually a variation on a phrase uttered frequently by an old Swede that I knew growing up. Hot weather would cause him to take off his hat, wipe his balding dome with a bandana, and say, repeatedly “Hot tamales, hot tamales.”

In the early days of my radio career, I modified the phrase for occasional use in weather forecasts for days when the weather was changing from cold to warmer; “Chili today, hot tamale.”

Etymology: Ivar Andren, Old Swede      First recorded use: Original ‘hot tamales’ early 1960’s; present version, early 1980’s

“It’s warmish” is a fairly recent addition to the family thesaurus, only coming into use when we moved from Minnesota to New Orleans. Subsequently, northern visitors have commented on the summer heat and humidity with pointed exclamations like ‘Geez, it’s hot!” to which the mind-over-matter counter to any perceived meteorological discomfort is an acknowledging, “It’s warmish.”

“It’s warmish” had its first use was in response to repeated commentary on June heat and humidity by our college age friend Stephan Immerfall, who helped us drive down here on our relocation. He took to the phrase, and brought it back north with him. Though ‘Warmish” has fallen mostly into disuse in Minnesota, we still utilize it regularly here in New Orleans. Especially when explaining weather to visitors from out-of-town.
Visitor: “Man! Its 97 degrees with 83% humidity! This is crazy!”
Any relocated Lucker: (nodding in agreement) “Yeah, it’s warmish.”

Etymology: Moving & transitioning  to New Orleans      First recorded use: 2008

“Oh yeah, bay-bee grammmaw!” was uttered by my youngest son Sam, now thirteen, when he was a toddler. He had been running around saying, “Oh yeah, baby” and one night we wanted him to say it to his grandma Mickelson, who was on the phone. The resulting, “C’mon, say ‘oh yeah, bay-bee’ for grandma” came out of Sam’s mouth as “Oh yeah, bay-beeee gram-maw!” and the phrase stuck.

To this day, even grandma Mickelson uses the phrase “Oh yeah, bay-bee grandma!” as a gleeful expression, such as when drawing the cards that give her a win in a card game, for example.

Etymology: Son Sam, who picked it up at daycare and modified it      First recorded use: 2001

“Somebody get that, it might be a phone call.” is a phrase my father used from time to time, much to my mother’s chagrin and annoyance. I picked it up (the phrase, not the phone) and used it in much the same way as my father (when a telephone would ring) much to the annoyance and puzzlement of most people.

Lindsay also found this one had stuck in her head while working her first job as a teenager, in a video store. She was stocking VHS tapes on a shelf at the far end of the store when the phone at the desk rang, prompting Lindsay to pop up and loudly proclaim, “Somebody get that, it MIGHT be a phone call!” This caused store customers to stop their browsing and look at her quizzically, as her coworkers did likewise.  This phrase is among the most frequently used in the Lucker lexicon.

Etymology: My father to me to Lindsay to Will and Sam      First recorded use: Early 1960’s

“Well don’t that just curdle yer milk!” is a general purpose show astonishment or incredulity at something incomprehensible; usually the behavior or utterance of another person. I picked up this little gem during my first job in radio in little Nevada, MO, from my friend and co-worker Jeff Tweeten.

This phrase had a longer shelf life and higher recognition factor when living in the rural Midwest, but can still elicit the ocassional nod of agreement from bystanders.

Etymology: Hanging out with Jeff in rural Missouri First recorded use: 1978

“What’s that got to do with the price of eggs in Cleveland?” is simply a more workable, Lucker family version of the traditional ‘What’s that got to do with the price of tea in China?’ retort to an irrelevant suggestion. Especially for the younger generation, eggs are more easily relatable as an analogy than tea, as Cleveland is more graspable as a concept than China.

While other foodstuffs and geographic locations have been improvised here, in the Lucker household eggs/Cleveland prevail. Though we all eat eggs, none of us have ever been to Cleveland.

Etymology: South Minneapolis Workforce Center      First recorded use: 2001

“While you’re up…” is a dinner table phrase used when everyone is sitting down and eating, and someone either needs something that wasn’t brought to the table or the dogs need to be let inside, or the fan turned or…? This is a functionally ironic term as it is used only while everyone is sitting down.

“While you’re up…” has occasionally been used in a pique of pure laziness in other rooms in the house and at times other than dinner, though that behavior is generally frowned upon.

Etymology: Family dinner table      First recorded use: Early 21st century

“Who would do that?” is a phrase daughter Lindsay came up with in her teens in collaboration with her stepmother Amy, and is usually used to poke fun at me for some perceived foible, misstep or oddball idea. Inflection varies and greatly alters the trajectory of meaning; “Who would do that?” is the more emphatic version, though “Who would DO that?” is the far more commonly used version.

The phrase has become a staple of family verbiage for all members.

Etymology: Custodial weekends      First recorded use: Mid 1990’s

“You young kids and your crazy ideas!” is a typical Lucker family response to something inexplicable or just plain weird. It is usually uttered in a tone of faux-condescension, mild sarcasm or gentle, tongue-in-cheek scolding…though at times in complete exasperation. It is typically spoken mostly by the two youngest members of the family and directed at either their parents or, once in a great while, at each other.

‘YYKAYCI’ is frequently used to highlight parental use of an archaic phrase or recounting of some childhood recipe or food like. Usually by  youngest son Sam.

Etymology: Sam Lucker, solo    First recorded use: 2011

There you have it; a short compendium of Lucker family verbiage. As we hold no copyright on any of the phrases listed above, have at them without fear of legal retribution. Print a copy and keep this guide handy if you’re coming to visit or planning on any verbal contact with the family. This guide can also serve as a good template for getting your own family’s linguistic quirks recorded for posterity and future generation’s edification.

You’re welcome.

Building a More Varied Vocabulary in 2012, Lesson 1

I recently got another lesson in accidental parenting – one of those I-didn’t-know-he-had-picked-that-one-up from youngest son Sam, nearly thirteen. While driving back to New Orleans from our Christmas in Minnesota, Sam was laying casually in the back of our mini van playing a video game, and something that occurred apparently surprised him. His blurted response?

“Son of a Bisquick pancake!”

I take complete ownership of the phrase, I know where he got it and I smiled with something resembling satisfaction, I suppose, as  (I believe)  I coined the phrase somewhere back around the turn of the century.

But until Sam’s recent vanclamation, I wasn’t aware he had picked up on it, though to be honest, he used the abbreviated version. The full phrase is actually, ‘Well I’ll be a son of a Bisquick pancake!”

To be sure, there are far shoddier rejoinders he could have uttered, and there are much worse (in my opinion) examples of phraseology that have somehow made their way into daily American vernacular and that I hear kids Sam’s age and younger uttering daily: ‘Oh snap’ and ‘Flippin’ coming immediately to mind.

We’ll just add “Son of a Bisquick pancake!” to the Thesaurus of Luckerisms available to the general public. It’ll be dog-eared in the volume somewhere along with these perennial favorites:

FAAA-reee? Did somebody say FAAA-ree?”
“I hear ya cluckin’ big chicken!”
“Hey, buddy! Only one shade of green in this town!”
“Somebody get that, it might be a phone call.”

As it is a far more versatile phrase along the lines of the former (‘FAAA-ree?’ of course referring to any situation where you are getting something for free, and the ever-affirming/esteem building ‘chicken’) and not nearly so limited as the two latter (‘green’ when you’re stuck in traffic behind someone who won’t move when the light changes, ‘phone’ obviously the choice of phrase whenever a phone rings) I see a bright future for this latest ‘Those Linguistic Luckers!’ innovation.

As we are not seeking a copyright, feel free to use it yourself. You’ll be surprised at how quickly and easily it will flow into your daily conversation: “Son of a Bisquick pancake!”

It’s as versatile a phrase as the product it borrows from. Play with the inflection in various forms for better effect and more conversational flexibility. You’ll find the phrase can be used to connote everything from basic surprise, ala Sam, to outright repugnance with someone or something.

And best of all, it’s not like your swearing. ‘I’ll be a son of a Bisquick pancake!’ doesn’t even nudge the needle on the vulgarity meter, so have at it with gusto.

I’ll make a prediction: About a week after reading this, you will use this new-found vocabularic gem without thinking about, and only when you realize what you have said (possibly due to a puzzled look from a fellow conversant) you will place your hands on your hips, and with some sense of wonder/disgust proclaim, to nobody in particular:

“Son of a Bisquick pancake! Lucker did it to me again!”

“I’ll take ‘Poultry Pronouncements’ for $500, Alex.”

Since we are on the topic of words and phrases (you are reading a blog – it’s always about words and phrases) and since they both have a tendency to come up in daily life, they need more attention and nurturing than they generally get. Your vocabulary, like your car, needs regular care and maintenance to function properly and last a long time.

Words and phrases are odd creatures; we tend to overuse certain favorites, regularly mangle and misuse others, and simply fail to increase the workable volume of useful and more colorful words and phrases available, which makes us dull and not listenable to others.

We need to be vigilant to keep our vocabularic skills fresh and interesting by adding, discarding and modifying on a regular basis. Plus, vocabulary building and repair has also been proven to keep minds more nimble and pliable.

For example, this is where, in our household, when you are in vehement agreement with what was just said, you might respond, “I hear ya’ cluckin’, Big Chicken!”

That’s a good, gets to the heart-of-the-matter phrase to start vocab restoration with. Try it. Use it liberally in daily conversation with a hearty dash of enthusiasm – you’ll be surprised at how quickly this versatile little catch-phrase catches on:

“I hear ya’ cluckin’, Big Chicken!”

It’s also a complimentary and validating phrase, as you are actively, positively acknowledging the opinion of the person you are agreeing with.

“I hear ya’ cluckin’, Big Chicken!”

Moving on to more vocabulary repair and rehab…

I longer go apoplectic when I hear people say ‘frozen tundra’ – must be a sign of maturity on my part. While that repetitively redundant phrase still irks me, I’ve moved on to more pertinent matters.

To wit…

Hey, America – the drink is ‘espresso’ NOT ‘expresso.’ Made well, espresso is a potently fine coffee drink. Expresso is…a Brazilian train that makes only one stop? I don’t know. Expecially when people who work in the coffee shop say ‘expresso’ I want to….espress to them my disappointment in their ignorance of the artistry and verbiage of their own craft.

“Buuuuuut, that’s just me!” – Spongebob Squarepants

And then there is pom-pon.

This one has bugged me for years, probably because I had a severe crush on a pom-pon girl in high school, and I took umbrage at people disparaging her craft and the tools of her trade with one misspoken word.

Pom-pon.

That’s  right, its pom-pon, kids…not ‘pom pom’ – though some misguided dictionary editors now apparently recognize the second ‘pom’ as a legitimate and approved option. Sigh. Language is a living, breathing thing, I know, but sometimes…well, you just gotta draw a line someplace.

This one I had relegated into the frozen tundra/jumbo shrimp I’m-over-it category until…

Spell check refused to acknowledge ‘pom-pon’ in something I was typing and tried to change it to ‘pom-pom.’ Troglodyte linguists. Now they’re going to get a letter from me asking for an explanation of their language ignorance.

But before you think I’m going to go on some sort of bizarre tirade here, it’s less about any roiling righteous indignation, more about what kind of response I actually may get from the Microsoft dweebs to use as blog fodder somewhere down the road. See, there is always a method to the madness here at Chaotic Zen.

Grammatical game-on, kids.

This next one really makes me scratch my head.

Living in the Midwest most of my life, I am quite familiar with canned foods. I frequently eat them, every store carries them, and they label their aisles as such: ‘Canned Food.’ Moving to New Orleans three-plus years ago, I noticed a discernible signage difference; here it is ‘Can Food.’

I noticed the wording at a number of different stores, representing different supermarket chains, and some independents as well. ‘Can Food’ is simply what it is here (with one notable, schizophrenic exception, to the right). To make sure I wasn’t just imagining this palpable turn of phrase, upon returning to Minnesota numerous times and visiting multiple stores I can confirm my initial observation: the stores there all say ‘Canned Foods.’ (Same holds true for grocery stores in Missouri and Iowa, so yeah – it’s a Midwestern thing.)

I finally got to address this issue with a grocery professional when I took a part-time job at a nice New Orleans grocery store. I asked my friend Tami why the canned food aisles here were labeled ‘Can Food.’ Her response?

“Well, I guess we call it can food because it’s food that comes in a can.”

Point taken. I told her about my northern grocery language, and she allowed that as a child, she would help her mom and grandma put up vegetables and preserves every year in the process we all refer to as ‘canning’ and that, yeah, she could see how some people might call it ‘canned food.’

“But it is still food in a can, so ‘Can Food’ makes sense to me.” she added, only somewhat smugly

Then again, when you can food at home, you are actually putting it into jars, but making that change in vernacular would probably be much too jarring for most.  Pardon the pun.

Tami then asked me about the ‘box dinner’ aisle and how that was labeled up north. I had to admit, that was one I couldn’t recall even having seen before, and would have to check next time I was in Minnesota. But now that I have been made aware of it, I realize almost every store in New Orleans has a ‘box dinner’ aisle.

Of course, we are also a nation that has been noted to park on driveways and drive on parkways, so canned food or can food or boxed dinners or box dinners or…?

Remember during the height of the space age, when astronauts were shown on grainy t.v. feeds from space eating food from a pouch, and that was supposed to be our food future here on earth? Most of us still don’t have cupboards full of that stuff, but any decent camping supply store has a huge array of freeze-dried and dehydrated products, which then begs the obvious question:

‘Pouch Food’ or ‘Pouched Food’?

“I hear ya cluckin’, Big Chicken!”

Made up!

People keep using the word ‘kersnorffle’ (most common spelling I’ve seen) on Facebook and blog posts I keep receiving. It is an interesting term, and I am sure someday soon it will be officially be a word, and added to the dictionary with great fanfare by Webster’s or whomever when they roll out the fresh dictionaries and new ‘official’ words every year.

‘Kersnorffle’ seems to usually be used to denote sarcasm or derision of something – or, in Sunday funnies vernacular, ‘Harrumph’ with a really sharp edge.

What is interesting to me is that the vast majority of uses of ‘kersnorffle’ I have seen on Facebook are from my friends at the extreme far ends of the political spectrum – logical, I suppose, as those far righties and lefties are the folks most likely to take umbrage at something and publicly vent their unbridled sarcasm with a made-up word. Probably some psychological offshoot of their shared paranoias.

But ‘kersnorffle’ is a hard word to read and not laugh at. I know people are trying to be dismissive, but it’s too dumb looking to qualify as derogatory. ’Kersnorffle’ is the killer platypus of phrases: it just looks too weird to be taken seriously.

So just maybe this is the common ground we have been searching for in this age of derisive politics and bad-mouthing rhetoric; to paraphrase Rodney King, “Can’t we all just kersnorfle together?”

Years ago my mother gave me a nice red, cable knit sweater for Christmas. I unwrapped it, took it out of the box, held it up in front of me, read the label to something I hadn’t seen before and haven’t since:

‘100% Virgin Acrylic.’        

Make up your own punch line.

Okay, one last time before we take the training wheels off and let you use it on your own:

“I hear ya cluckin’, Big Chicken!”

Hand-me-downs

Today was another in a long-line of phrases uttered by my children when I wonder, “Where’d they get that…oh yeah, from me”.

Enjoying our Mardi Gras break, the four of us went to the mall, as Sam had some eleventh birthday money, and something he wanted to spend it on. The boys and I were in one store, Amy went into J.C. Penney. We got done, went to find mom, and while roaming the women’s department Sam asked why we were looking for her there. I thought that he had understood that would be where she was heading when she left us at the video game store. Will piped in that I had told him that, but not Sam. I apologized for not letting Sam in on the itinerary.

Sam replied, “Well, thanks for sharing THAT little tidbit of information”.

That is one of my little catch phrases that I had never heard him use before.

Fourteen year old Will has used that a time or two, along with a few other favorites from the family: “Your WHAT hurts”? comes readily to mind as a regular rejoinder.

When daughter Lindsay, now 25, was in high school, she got a job working at a video store. One afternoon, as she was stocking videos on a remote shelf, the store phone rang. Popping up above the shelf, she reflexively hollered a favorite line still used in our household:

“Somebody get that – it MIGHT be a phone call”!

The store was filled with co-workers and customers who all stopped and stared at her. Eventually, the phone was presumably answered.

Never a one-trick-pony, she once startled a high-school classmate who she was riding in a car with by yelling at the stationary vehicle in front of them, which didn’t move as the light turned to their favor:

“Hey, buddy! Only ONE shade of green in this town”!

That one we can at least credit to my late father as a legitimate family verbiage heirloom. Same with picking up the phone and saying, “It’s your dime – start talking”! which Lindsay has also been known to utter on occasion. That one, of course, has far outlived its usefulness in terms of monetary value and antiquated communication techniques.

Another holdover phrase from her youth is one Lindsay uses quite regularly in verbal form, but also as an exclamation of excitement on Facebook: “Yahoozle”!

Loosely translated, that means ‘yippee’ or ‘oh boy’ in Luckerspeak. I always enjoy seeing that one posted on-line, as she takes tradition into an entirely contemporary realm, making it her own.

The great thing about the word ‘yahoozle’ is its verbal flexibility; said with the proper inflection of pure excitement, the message (if not the word itself) is contagious. However, if so needed, a little twist on syllabic emphasis, or simply dragging out one of the first two, turns it into quirky sarcasm; “Yaaaaa-hoozle” can sure deflate an emotional balloon.

Lindsay is a master at all forms of yahoozle usage.

There is one more phrase that Lindsay says she has used from time, which is humorous to me, because I used it on here for a number of years before she finally asked me to explain it. As a single dad, it was an all-purpose, meaning-laden sign-off to most every personal visit or a phone conversation. I always tried to end our time together by telling Lindsay – “Be good…or at least be prompt”!

I consider that the Lucker family version of ‘carpe diem’.

All together now: “Thanks for sharing that little tidbit of information”.